db_HMS-Courageous-Crest22
NEW TITLE BAR
055-T-shirt gif

H.M.S. Courageous was the last of the Valiant Class submarines. She was built by Vickers (Shipbuilding) Limited at Barrow-in-Furness. Her keel was laid down on the 15th of May 1968 and she was launched on the 7th of March 1970 as S50 (SSN06). At a ceremony held at Vickers, she was commissioned into the Royal Navy Submarine Flotilla on the 16th of October 1971.

The Boat’s vital statistics were impressive.

DISPLACEMENT SURFACED: 4300 TONS - DISPLACEMENT DIVED: 4800 TONS

LENGTH- 285 feet     BEAM - 33 feet    DRAUGHT (depth of keel in the water) - 27 Feet

SPEED DIVED: 28 KNOTS PLUS - SPEED SURFACED: 18 KNOTS

COMPLEMENT: 13 OFFICERS AND 103 RATINGS (Variable)

MAIN MACHINERY: ONE NUCLEAR REACTOR AND ENGLISH ELECTRIC GEARED STEAM TURBINES

ARMAMENT: SIX 21 INCH TORPEDO TUBES WHICH COULD BE USED TO LAUNCH MK 8 OR MK 24 (WIRE GUIDED) TORPEDOES, MK5 AND MK 6 MINES AND ROYAL NAVY SUB HARPOON MISSILE

2.74.012--1-

Courageous was a formidable underwater weapon. Her time submerged was limited only by the food that could be carried and the endurance of the crew. Her nuclear reactor was a virtually limitless power supply driving both the propulsion and the life support systems onboard. Making fresh water and even oxygen from the sea water around her, she could remain beneath the surface for months at a time. Her sonar allowed Courageous to listen quietly for the sounds made by other ships and submarines and her weapons meant that she carried a real sting with which she could both defend and attack. The small nuclear reactor (about the size of a household dustbin) provided heat to produce steam for the turbines which drove the propellor as well as for the turbo generators which produced enough electricity to supply a small town.

dive 1        Dive 2       Dive 3

055-T-shirt PLAINCourageous was based at Faslane Submarine Base situated on the Gareloch in Western Scotland throughout her operational career as part of the Third Submarine Squadron. She conducted many Cold War patrols, mostly in the North Atlantic. Her crew named her “The Mean Machine” and the nickname was to remain with her throughout her service. Many of the T-shirts worn bore the cartoon designed by the crew.

Her ship’s journal, many editions of which are classified, bore the ship’s mascot, Hissing Sid also known as “The Werm” which derived from the snake depicted in the ship’s badge. This was the name given to the journals. Although we would love to publish those newsletters here we are unable to do so because of their content and the Official Secrets Act.

Courageous underwent a major refit in Chatham from September 1976 to August 1978 following which she returned to operational duties. She was then to become the trials submarine for the Royal Navy Sub-Harpoon missile and was based at San Diego in the USA for nine months. During the Falklands Conflict of 1982, Courageous served in the South Atlantic, carrying out no less than four patrols in the area. During this second commission Courageous and her crew also carried out two deployments to the Mediterranean and, in addition, visited San Diego, Charleston, San Francisco, Wilemstad, Curacao, Liverpool, Hull, Bremerhaven, Bermuda, Haifa (probably the only nuclear submarine ever to visit Israel), Corfu, Naples, La Maddalena and, of course, Gibraltar.

In 1984 another refit took place, this time in Devonport, Plymouth. She again returned to operational duties in January 1987 and served the fleet for another five years undertaking Spearfish Torpedo Trials visiting the American Underwater Test and Evaluation Centre (AUTEC) on three occasions and visited Cape Canaveral, Fort Lauderdale, Liverpool, Bermuda, Stavanger and Gibraltar.

Csunsetourageous was finally paid off at Devonport in April 1992 where she was fully de-fuelled and laid up and that is where the crew, past and present, thought that her story had come to an end. They were wrong.

In 2002 she was removed from mothballs and moved to No. 3 Dock where she was open to the public as a unique exhibit in the UK. Ongoing problems with the caissoon, which seals the dock, necessitated her move back to 3 Basin in 2007 where she once again opened to the public.

The boat underwent a further refurbishment at the end of 2020 and has only recently moved back into 3 basin where she will be fully prepared for her role as a visitor attraction. Unfortunately, due to delays in a planned maintenance docking, repaint and electrical work, entirely due to the Covid 19 pandemic visits cannot currently take place and the boat is closed to visitors until further notice. It is hoped the boat will open again soon

In 2012 Courageous celebrated 10 years service as the only nuclear submarine on public display in the United Kingdom and one of only 2 in Europe (the other is the French ballistic missile submarine Redoubtable in Cite de la Mer museum in Cherbourg).

The boat is also due to be transferred to the care of the NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE ROYAL NAVY, (NMRN), and there are plans, yet to be fully confirmed, for the boat to form the centrepiece of a cold war museum in Plymouth, located outside of the secure Naval Dockyard, enabling greater ease of access. This multi million pound project is still in the early stages and will take some time to come to fruition. It will, however, cement the long term future of Courageous as a unique exhibit in the UK.

We will do our best to bring you updates on the boat as a display and any work going on to improve her. Many of those who have visited have provided feedback saying how impressed they have been with the work carried out by the volunteers. What most visitors don’t realise is, that if it weren’t for those volunteers, the boat would probably be unfit for display. The MOD have, due to defence spending restrictions, been able to invest very little in the way of finance into the boat and it is only on the rare occasion that the volunteers receive assistance from the dockyard or serving personnel. It is unknown just how many hours the volunteers have put into producing a first class exhibit but it must run into thousands, and that does not include the time they spend showing visitors around the boat. It is a great pity that access to the boat is not easier but that will not change as long as the boat remains within the perimeter of the working yard. It is hoped that the alliance with the National Museum of the Royal Navy will bring improvements.

If you visit the boat and have any feedback which you would like us to add to the site or pass on to the volunteers in Plymouth please let us know by e mailing us at:

R

The images and information contained within this web site are the intellectual property of The HMS Courageous Association and may not be reproduced, copied or used for commercial gain without the prior permission of The Association. The images may be used for personal use